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norwegian cooking

Norwegian cooking: Komler

So, potato balls. How about them? Every district in Norway seem to have their own variation of these, including the name.  And there are different condiments and drinks according to where you are in the country. Even to the point where someone wrote and published a book about it. My Dad’s …

Norwegian cooking: Gomme

A lot of the time, traditional Norwegian food does not look particularly appetizing. In many cases, it looks bland and boring. And other times, it sort of looks like a brain exploded. Which is why, if you’re throwing a Halloween bash or a gory themed party, this dish is perfect …

Norwegian cooking: Russedessert

In my quest to explore the traditional Norwegian cuisine, the time had come to do Russedessert. Essentially, it is cordial mixed with water and semolina (and possibly also sugar) on the stovetop until it has congealed and then once it has cooled, it is whisked into a creamy pudding. The …

Norwegian cooking: Caramel pudding

I have a memory of watching my grandmother making caramel pudding in our kitchen at home. It might have been either my confirmation or my sister’s christening – since she was making it at our place and not her own. But it would also frequently be among the staples for …

Scandinavian cooking: Wales kringle

Oddly enough named Waleskringle – I have no idea where the name comes from. If I were to hazard a guess, as it is an old Danish dessert, I would guess that it might have been named when Princess Alexandra of Denmark married the Prince of Wales, although one dictionary …

Mickey Mouse-shaped Oat Waffles

Norwegian-style waffles are softer than the Belgian ones. There are about as many different recipes as there are households, I’d think. They’re usually heart-shaped, but I couldn’t resist using my sister’s Mickey Mouse waffle-iron. These ones came about when I was cleaning up my diet by doing  low-GI for a …

Norwegian Christmas Baking: Kakemenn

Quite literally translated as Cookie Men, these are essentially white sugar cookies, with a small change. Instead of baking powder or baking soda, the leavener is horn salt, or ammonium bicarbonate, which gives it a slight “kick” in flavor, and makes the kitchen smell a bit odd while they’re baking in …

Mutton in cabbage

 Mutton in cabbage, or Fårikål, in Norwegian, is one of the recipes that Norwegians view as traditional and Norwegian. It usually is made in the fall, and actually has a whole day dedicated to it. September 29. There are also groups dedicated to it, and friends will get together for …

Norwegian Christmas Cooking: Sirupsnipper

Or as a translation to English might be: Syrup Diamonds. Basically because they’re meant to be shaped like men’s cuff (hence the name in Norwegian) but actually look like the diamonds you find on playing cards. Well, they’re meant to. Mine just looks, er…, odd. But they taste good, and …

Norwegian Cooking: Serina Cookies

When I was younger, I thought that these cookies were just a tradition in our family. See, my great grandmother was called Serina, and I obviously thought that was the reason for why we were making them. At any rate, they are a delicious butter cookie that you just keep …

Norwegian cooking: Sitronfromasj

Or, lemon mousse in English, of which there seems to be oodles of recipes on the internet. I think the first time I really made this dessert, was back in home ec. in seventh grade. I remember it, because the other dish my group had to prepare, boiled fish of …

Norwegian cooking: Pearl Porridge

Growing up, I always loved going to my grandmother’s to eat. Not just the Sunday steak, where dinner was followed by dessert, which in turn was followed by coffee and cakes, but also for some of the more everyday meals. One of those meals was sago porridge, or pearl porridge …