Quotation Monday #152: Reading

Well, he read in the strangest way. I mean, I could never read unless I’d have a rainy afternoon or a long evening in bed, or something. He’d read walking, he’d read at the table, at meals, he’d read after dinner, he’d read in the bathtub, he’d read—prop open a book on his desk—on his bureau—while he was doing his tie. You know, he’d just read in little, he’d open some book I’d be reading, you know, just devour it. He really read all the times you don’t think you have time to read.

– Jacqueline Kennedy.

Jacqueline Kennedy : Historic Conversations on Life with John F. Kennedy

I bought an apartment

and am currently waiting to see if my loan application go through. Signed the contract on the house yesterday.

The bank gave me a pre-approval for a sum before I went hunting, and I am actually applying for less loan than I was pre-approved for. So, theoretically, I should be ok. Still a jittery process. Waiting. Waiting.
I move in June. 

I started packing. I have packed a (large) box of dvds and three (smaller) boxes of books. I am almost unable to see that on the shelves. May is going to be a long month.

Quotation Monday #149 – No normal

“There is boring. There is sensational. There is mediocre. There is lazy. There is good. There is evil. People do implausible things all the time, and they run the gamut of moderately weird to truly extraordinary. But there is no normal. The world is an unbelievable place full of unbelievable people doing unbelievable things.”

― Penny Reid, Love Hacked

The wall

  
I was six when the Berlin wall fell. I am not sure my memory of it is real – being allowed from bed to watch it on TV with my parents, or if it is something that happened on another occasion. 

But I do remember that for almost all of my elementary school years, we still had the East Germany/West Germany maps in the class rooms. (Not forgetting the Soviet maps.)

Walking along parts of the old wall today, and reading the signs was a powerful experience.

Linguistics

Random thought I had: in Norwegian you typically say, I take the train. (Jeg tar toget.) 

But you can also, albeit very informally, say: Jeg toger. It directly translates to: I am training. However, where it in Norwegian it is understandable what you’re doing, it completely changes meaning in English and has nothing to do with trains anymore.

The things that come through my head when I take the train and have the time to sit down and ponder.

It doesn’t always have to make sense.

Birkebeiner ski race

Crown Prince Haakon and Crown Prince Frederik will both be skiing the Birkebeiner race this Saturday – so of course the newspaper have titled it the duel of the Crown Princes.

The Birkebeiner ski race is 54 km long, and goes from Rena to Lillehammer. It commemorates the rescue in 1206 of the young Håkon Håkonsson – the heir to the Norwegian throne, according to the Birkebeiner faction. The rescue went on skis from Lillehammer to Østerdalen, as two warriors carried the young prince on his way to safety. To further symbolise the event, all the skiers will carry a backpack weighing 3.5 kgs, about the same as someone the age of the prince would have weighed.

Prince Oscar, Duke of Scania

In a council of state, the king revealed just now that Victoria and Daniel’s son will have the names Oscar Carl Olof. He will be called Oscar.

He will be the Duke of Scania (Skåne) in Southern Sweden. The last royal duke of Scania was King Gustaf Adolf, who died in 1973.

The name Oscar… Well, there have been two Bernadotte kings by the name, as well as the second son of Oscar II. He married a non-royal, and renounced his rights to the Swedish throne. 

Oscar is not as unexpected of a name as Estelle was. It is also already popular in Sweden – in 2015 it was the 4th most popular name for newborn boys.

It works well with Estelle, but it also works well with the cousins Leonore and Nicolas.